Recent posts

Now Hiring!

1 minute read

In a few weeks I’ll begin a project – the Digital History Advanced Research Projects Accelerator – as part of my new position at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH). The Accelerator aims to create and promote software that capitalizes on digitalized historical research practices. More important than this software – and the key to its success – is the team I am currently recruiting to participate in its development and design. With the generous support of the Luxembourg National Research Fund and the University of Luxembourg, we’re running searches for a dozen new positions over the next year, including three postdoctoral researchers, three software developers, four fully-funded PhD positions, and administrative staff, and we also have...

Tropy

2 minute read

In late November 2010, on the last day of a research visit to Aix-en-Provence, I set down some thoughts on how historians’ practices had seemed to change overnight: what is the future of the archive? archival work now focused more narrowly, more intensely. but also potentially doesn’t provide enough time to get the feel for the archives and change direction. digital photography as a major change. archives now about raw collection, little or no feedback loop between what’s being observed and what comes next. requires a fundamentally different rhythm, one that i’m not yet comfortable with My reflections — which went on to include such uninspired predictions as “finding aids will soon all be online” — drew on my own...

Long-term Sustainability of PressForward

2 minute read

As this year’s Open Access Week winds down, I’m really pleased to share that the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will generously fund a new, three-year phase of PressForward to ensure its long-term sustainability. The key deliverables of the grant are the launch of a dozen high-quality science publications and the continued refinement of the PressForward software to lower the barrier to entry for new research groups who want to create a collaborative publication. While “sustainability” is probably the most dreaded criterion of any grant application, it’s an area that I actually enjoy working on in its own right. At RRCHNM we’ve been fortunate to shepherd Zotero and Omeka through phases of grant funding that were explicitly intended to lay the...

Hello Tropy (soon)

2 minute read

I’m happy to announce the funding of Tropy, a major new RRCHNM initiative that Stephen Robertson and I will lead over the next two years. Thanks to the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Tropy will fill a crucial need in the initial phase of the research process: where humanities researchers organize and analyze their vast and rapidly growing personal collections of digital images collected in the archives. In the coming months we’ll be working closely with researchers and a range of archives to develop an entirely new digital tool that enables the efficient import, editing, organization, search, and sharing of images taken in the archives. Although we’re just getting started, I’m already excited about Tropy for a...

On Bubbles, or This Time It’s Different

3 minute read

This week Inside Higher Ed stirred the DH pot with a thinly-evidenced piece suggesting that we’re in the midst of a “Digital Humanities Bubble” which is supposedly about to burst. As someone who has spent nearly eight years struggling to fill a range of alt-ac, tenure-track, and tenured digital positions, while simultaneously trying to retain the good people we already have at RRCHNM, this comes as welcome news! If only. Since 2006 I’ve been party to over a dozen hires in digital and “traditional” history, and in every single one of those cases, the market dynamic in digital searches has been profoundly different from traditional ones. Whether there’s rapid or modest growth in digital history positions is kind of beside...